Over to you

Given that, unlike some, I don’t have a remote interior designer, I was wondering whether you guys would like to help out with the process of designing the new house.

So welcome to the first mirrormirror interactive interior designer’ poll. 

Though I don’t promise to always act on your advice, I’m genuinely interested to hear what you think.  Please expand on your ideas if necessary in the comments box and if you want, let me know in the comments which country you’re from.  It will be fascinating to see if we get international differences of opinion.

 


Create polls and vote for free. dPolls.com

NB. Option 4 is unlikely to be the right answer

 

 

Exhibit 1 is the bright red fireplace in the main sitting room, which has a large window facing east and smaller stained glass windows in yellow and faded red facing south.  The room is flooded with light in the morning and remains very light for most of the day. (By the way, we’re going to be discussing/dissing the wallcolour and the stove at a later date)

So, what would you do with the fireplace it if you were me? 

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Comments

  1. says

    Strip it back to the original bricks and insert a big oak beam above (cut into the wall) to create a mantle shelf, if you get someone to use a compressed air sander on it it will be smooth as a baby’s bum. Above, a big oak framed mirror done in the same way as the shelf.
    UK

  2. says

    If you like the yellow walls, go white. Yes, quickly. If the walls and woodwork are going to change, white might not be so good. Its not too practical a color for a fireplace anyway. The former owners liked stong color contrasts didn’t they? USA

  3. says

    Love the poll idea. I would strip it back to the original. Unless you would want to keep the red only dry brush a black glaze over it to tone it down (which is probably what I would do if it was in my house) That way only a minimal amount of the red shows through, but still just enough to pull from the stained glass. I also agree with the previous comment that the mantle needs to be different. I don’t know what your taste is, but what about putting some kind of artistic-metal-scrollwork (for lack of a better term) in the three inset boxes surrounding the opening. That way it would be two-dimensional and utilize different textures. Tired now, must sleep. USA

  4. says

    White is a good bet, and should compliment any colour scheme you choose, and you can always add colour and textures in the choice of what you display above. UK

  5. kate says

    I agree with other posters. white until you know what you are doing with the walls. I like the idea of stripping it back with some white still on it. Sort of worn. Do you know the look I’m so poorly tryng to convey?

  6. says

    One thing you might consider is which gua (feng shui) your living room is in– that might help inform the balance of the elements/color, too. I loved the ideas above of putting in a big wooden mantle above– I think white would get pretty gody pretty fast if you actually used the fireplace– stripping is a HUGE job– I am always looking for the easy way out– so the idea of dry brushing over the white sounds faboo– though I might not use full on black– I might due more of a dark brown or brick red color.
    I know whatever you choose to do it will be spectacular and I look forward to following along–

  7. says

    I’d be inclined to go with white for the time being, live with it for while. The danger in stripping and potentially damaging the brick is too great. Or at least with us the case has been, if the previous owners had a way of compromising the integrity of something, they did. Anticipate the worst.
    And at the risk of sounding like a total ass kiss, I must say your photographs are truly lovely and I have a bit of a crush on the way you write.

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